Introduction

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This module presents deforestation in developing countries, through a case study of tropical deforestation in the Chqiuibul National Park in Belize. It features Friends for Development and Conservation (FCD), who have been at the fore front of addressing threats to the Chiquibul Forest in the Cayo District of Belize through adaptive management.

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In the spring of 2014, students in Conservation Biology class with Dr. Evans at Sewanee: The University of the South, raised awareness about the threats to the Chiquibul and the FCD’s efforts to alleviate the threats. They used the Palm Sunday Connection- xate palms illegally extracted in the Chiquibul by Guatemalans are shipped around the world for Palm Sunday- as a way to connect people with the greater threats. They created a website with a video for each threat and solution. The videos had information about each topic that was extracted and synthesized from reports, newsletters, and papers from FCD.  They also used pictures, short videos, and interviews to make the videos more moving, to inspire people to donate to the cause.

This module was modeled after the awareness project but goes more in depth into each threat and solution and explores these topics through reports, newsletters, papers, journal articles, maps, figures, videos, and photos mostly from FCD. The module uses tabs to introduce the players in the Chiquibul, the biodiversity stakes at risk, the threats to the Chiquibul, the solutions to alleviate the threats, educational materials to use in a class setting, as well as a fundraising project. Each menu tab drops down to go into more detail about each of these topics affecting the Chiquibul. The tabs are laid out to present the case study in sequential order so that students understand the complexity of the threats without outside research.

This module was created by Geanina Fripp under the mentorship of Professor Jon Evans at Sewanee: The University of the South. The project was funded by a grant from the Associated Colleges of the South. For questions, comments, or concerns email: jevans@sewanee.edu.